6/6/2016

THIS IS THE EYE STORY I SAID I WOULD GET TO YOU.
 
P.S.  MY HEALING TIME WAS ABOUT A MONTH!
 
HI, I'M JOE I HAVE  PTERYGIUM.  LOOK AT INFO BELOW TO LEARN WHAT IT IS, HOW TO TREAT, AND THE REMOVAL PROCESS.

I USED THE JOHN ELLIS WATER AS EYE DROPS. SIMPLY SQUIRT THE WATER IN YOUR EYES AND WATCH FOR SOMETHING AMAZING.  I DROPPED  2 DROPS IN EACH EYE FOR A FOR A MONTH, AND I WAS HEALED!
 
MY RIGHT IS ALL CLEARED UP.  THE LEFT EYE WAS READY FOR SURGERY BECAUSE THE VISION WAS BAD.  NOW THE LEFT EYE IS  GETTING  BETTER.  MY VISION IS VERY GOOD NOW IN BOTH EYES!
 
P.S. YOU SHOULD KNOW THAT THE JOHN ELLIS DROPS IN THE EYES BURNS INITIALLY UNTIL YOU START TO HEAL THEN IT'S MUCH  BETTER.  ALSO THE BURN LAST 10-15 SECONDS.  THIS SHORT PAIN IS NOT AS BAD AS THE PAIN FROM SURGICALLY REMOVING THE PTERYGIUM.  SURGERY HAS LOTS OF PAIN  FOR AT LEAST 3 DAYS.

JOE R.

What is a pterygium? [pronounced tuh-rij-ee-uhm]

A pterygium is a benign winged-shaped growth of tissue that can expand over the cornea (the clear front window to the eye). It may remain small and not require any treatment or may grow large enough to interfere with vision. Growth usually occurs slowly, over many years, but can also have periods of rapid growth. A pterygium most commonly grows from the nasal corner of the eye.

How is pterygium treated?

Protecting your eyes from excessive ultraviolet light with proper sunglasses, wearing a hat and avoiding dry and dusty conditions can be the best way to reduce unwanted symptoms.  When a pterygium becomes red and irritated, eye drops or ointments may be used to reduce the inflammation.  If the pterygium becomes large enough to threaten your vision or causes significant discomfort, surgery may be necessary.

How is it surgically removed?

Surgery is minimally invasive and takes roughly 20-30 minutes. The pterygium is first carefully peeled, then a tissue graft is harvested from beneath your upper eyelid and placed over the removal site to reduce the chance of recurrence. The graft is usually secured with tissue glue and rarely needs sutures. The site where the tissue is harvested heals on its own.

-Joe R.

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